October 25, 2020

Holy Eucharist

See below for complete bulletin.  

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October 25, 2020

Holy Eucharist

Celebrant             Blessed be God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

People                And blessed be his kingdom, now and forever.  Amen.

 

Collect of the Day

Celebrant             The Lord be with you.

People                 And also with you.

Celebrant            Almighty and everlasting God, increase in us the gifts of faith, hope, and charity; and, that we may obtain what you promise, make us love what you command; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


A Reading from the Book of Leviticus (19:1-2, 15-18)

The Lord spoke to Moses, saying:  Speak to all the congregation of the people of Israel and say to them: You shall be holy, for I the Lord your God am holy.  You shall not render an unjust judgment; you shall not be partial to the poor or defer to the great: with justice you shall judge your neighbor. You shall not go around as a slanderer among your people, and you shall not profit by the blood of your neighbor: I am the Lord.  You shall not hate in your heart anyone of your kin; you shall reprove your neighbor, or you will incur guilt yourself. You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against any of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the Lord.

Reader    The Word of the Lord.

People     Thanks be to God.

 

Celebrant            The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew (22:34-40)

People                 Glory to you, Lord Christ.

When the Pharisees heard that Jesus had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together, and one of them, a lawyer, asked him a question to test him. “Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest?” He said to him, “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.”

Celebrant             The Gospel of the Lord.

People                 Praise to you, Lord Christ.


Reflection                                                                                                                          Father Piret

When I was growing up, in the days of the old 1928 Prayer Book, these words were spoken by the priest at every celebration of the Eucharist.  Very near the beginning, every Sunday:

 

“Hear what our Lord Jesus Christ saith.  Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.  This is the first and great commandment.  And the second is like unto it; Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.  On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets.”

 

Those words, the Summary of the Law, are still there in our current Prayer Book – even if they are less used these days.  They are a good way to begin worship, putting our duty into sharp focus from the outset.  Love God, love your neighbor.  But although the words are clear, they are not simple.

 

Loving God, as a commandment.  Puzzling, isn’t it?  Considering the way we normally think about love.  Love is not something we do on command.  It just happens.   Love can’t be compelled.  We can be commanded to do many things, of course: commanded to do good deeds for our neighbor; commanded to obey the orders of God, yes.  But commanded to love?  How does this come about – when love is not something in our power to do, or feel, as an act of will?

 

I would say it’s about consciously placing our hearts, souls, and minds, in a space where such love can be planted as a seed by God, and grow naturally.  Where love can be kindled, even if only from a little spark, and nurtured into a flame.

 

You could say it’s about tuning in to a certain wavelength – being open to the wonder of God, of creation, and our relationships with each other.  Until such wonder becomes a wellspring, a stream, a source of Love.

 

I want to share with you a passage by the twentieth-century writer Aldous Huxley, which I find helpful on this theme.  Maybe you will too.  Huxley was not conventionally religious in any way – but I think his words give us insight all the same into how a certain kind of “tuning in” to the world around us, a certain awareness, can open our eyes more clearly to the goodness and beauty of God.  Opening our hearts with wonder and gratitude, like opening up soil, in which love can take root.

 

Huxley writes in the belief that the presence of God can be seen all around us, if we will only notice it: that the world is charged with the wonder, beauty, and order of God.  God is the “deepest meaning of all that exists,” he says, and there are signs of God everywhere:

  •        “in the alternate voids and fullnesses of a cathedral ...
  •        “in the living geometry of a flower, a sea shell, an animal;
  •        “in the pauses and intervals between notes of music ... and also, he says, “on the plane of conduct”:
  •        “in the love and gentleness, the confidence and humility, which give beauty to the relationships between human beings.”

Those words almost read like a poem, and they are deep with meaning.  Seeing the beauty of created things ... seeing gentle, harmonious relationships between human beings, as all knit together with the wonder of God ... to me makes it easier to grasp how genuine love for God can be planted, then start to grow in our hearts and souls and minds.

 

It’s by being attentive to such wonder, and attentive to the beauty of our relationships when we are in harmony with God and each other.  It’s in that soil of wonder and gratefulness that feelings of love will grow naturally, as a gift.  Love towards the Creator who has made all things and has declared them to be good.  

 

How can we increase in this openness, attentiveness – opening up to this living love for God?  I would say, most of all, by deepening the time we spend in prayer.  Anytime; almost anywhere.  If we think of prayer as something we only ever do in church, it’s time to be more imaginative.  (Have you noticed, the memorable images we have of Jesus at prayer are not in the synagogue but outdoors?)  We can pray while we take a solitary walk; or pray while sitting in a chair. Maybe with something we have brought in from the natural world, a leaf – a flower – an acorn – some natural icon of God’s handiwork.  Even with a card or letter from someone dear to us who has left this world.

 

There is so much to be grateful for, to wonder at: giving us love ... so it can grow.  And it does.  Love for the God who has made us.  When we stop to notice, we see: God gives what God commands. 


Nicene Creed  

We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty,

      maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God,

      eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light,

      true God from true God, begotten, not made, of one Being with the Father.

      Through him all things were made. 

            For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven:

            by the power of the Holy Spirit

            he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary, and was made man.  

            For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried.       

On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures;

            he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead,

    and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,

    who proceeds from the Father and the Son.

    With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.

    He has spoken through the Prophets.

  We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.

      We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.

      We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.  Amen.

 

The Prayers of the People

Leader       In peace, we pray to you, Lord God.

Leader     For all people in their daily life and work;

People       For our families, friends, and neighbors, and for those who are alone.

Leader       For this community, the nation, and the world;

People       For all who work for justice, freedom, and peace.

Leader       For the just and proper use of your creation;

People       For the victims of hunger, fear, injustice, and oppression.

Leader       For all who are in danger, sorrow, or any kind of trouble;

People       For those who minister to the sick, the friendless, and the needy.

Leader       For the peace and unity of the Church of God;

People       For all who proclaim the Gospel, and all who seek the Truth.

Leader       For Michael our Presiding Bishop, Lawrence and Geralyn our Bishops; and

                 for all bishops and other ministers;

People       For all who serve God in his Church.

Leader       For the special needs and concerns of this congregation.  Among the sick, we remember by name:  

                 Anne, Carlos, Robyn, Donna, Bruce, Danny, Susan, Beatrice, Andrew, Robert, Joannie, Craig, Marie-Claire,                             Ruth, Sarah, Carol and John, Clint, Trevor, Bernice and Eddie.  Hear us, Lord;

People      For your mercy is great.

Leader      We thank you, Lord, for all the blessings of this life.

Leader        We will exalt you, O God our King;

People     And praise your Name for ever and ever.

Leader      We pray for all who have died, that they may have a place in your eternal kingdom.

Leader      Lord, let your loving-kindness be upon them;

People      Who put their trust in you.

Leader      We pray to you also for the forgiveness of our sins.


Leader and People

Have mercy upon us, most merciful Father;

in your compassion forgive us our sins,

known and unknown,

things done and left undone;

and so uphold us by your Spirit

that we may live and serve you in newness of life,

to the honor and glory of your Name;

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

Celebrant        Almighty God have mercy on you, forgive you all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen you in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep you in eternal life. Amen.


The Peace - exchanged without physical contact

Celebrant        The peace of the Lord be always with you.

People            And also with you.

 

Great Thanksgiving                                                                     Eucharistic Prayer A -- BCP p. 361

Celebrant             The Lord be with you.

People                 And also with you.

Celebrant             Lift up your hearts.

People                 We lift them to the Lord.

Celebrant             Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.

People                 It is right to give him thanks and praise.

 

Celebrant           

It is right, and a good and joyful thing, always and everywhere to give thanks to you, Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth.  For you are the source of light and life; you made us in your image, and called us to new life in Jesus Christ our Lord.  Therefore we praise you, joining our voices with Angels and Archangels and with all the company of heaven, who for ever sing this hymn to proclaim the glory of your Name:


Celebrant and People

Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might,

heaven and earth are full of your glory.

    Hosanna in the highest.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.

    Hosanna in the highest.


Celebrant

Holy and gracious Father: In your infinite love you made us for yourself; and, when we had fallen into sin and become subject to evil and death, you, in your mercy, sent Jesus Christ, your only and eternal Son, to share our human nature, to live and die as one of us, to reconcile us to you, the God and Father of all.  He stretched out his arms upon the cross, and offered himself in obedience to your will, a perfect sacrifice for the whole world.

On the night he was handed over to suffering and death, our Lord Jesus Christ took bread; and when he had given thanks to you, he broke it, and gave it to his disciples, and said, “Take, eat: This is my Body, which is given for you.  Do this for the remembrance of me.”  After supper he took the cup of wine; and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, and said, “Drink this, all of you: This is my Blood of the new Covenant, which is shed for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins.  Whenever you drink it, do this for the remembrance of me.”  Therefore we proclaim the mystery of faith:

Christ has died.

Christ is risen.

Christ will come again.

We celebrate the memorial of our redemption, O Father, in this sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving.  Recalling his death, resurrection, and ascension, we offer you these gifts.  Sanctify them by your Holy Spirit to be for your people the Body and Blood of your Son, the holy food and drink of new and unending life in him.  Sanctify us also that we may faithfully receive this holy Sacrament, and serve you in unity, constancy, and peace; and at the last day bring us with all your saints into the joy of your eternal kingdom.  All this we ask through your Son Jesus Christ.  By him, and with him, and in him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit all honor and glory is yours, Almighty Father, now and for ever.  Amen.


As our Savior Christ has taught us, we now pray:

Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy Name,

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done,

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those

who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

and the power, and the glory,

for ever and ever. Amen.

 

The Breaking of the Bread       A period of silence is kept.

Celebrant                        Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us;

Celebrant & People           Therefore let us keep the feast.

 

Communion Motet                             O Taste and See                      Sung by the Choir on May 18, 2014

Words: Psalm 34, v. 8                                                                         Music: Ralph Vaughn-Williams (1872-1958)

 

                                     O taste and see how gracious the Lord is:

                                     Blest is the one that trusteth in him.

           

 Post-Communion Prayer                                                                                    BCP p. 365


Celebrant                 Let us pray.

Celebrant and People   

Eternal God, heavenly Father,

you have graciously accepted us as living members

of your Son our Savior Jesus Christ,

and you have fed us with spiritual food

in the Sacrament of his Body and Blood.

Send us now into the world in peace,

and grant us strength and courage

to love and serve you

with gladness and singleness of heart;

through Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

The Priest gives the Blessing

Dismissal

Celebrant             Go in peace to love and serve the Lord. 

People                 Thanks be to God.

Sunday, October 18, 2020

Holy Eucharist

For the full bulletin, please see below.

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Sunday, October 18, 2020

Holy Eucharist

Prelude              Prelude on Prayer of St. Richard (Improvisation)                          

Celebrant           Blessed be God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

People                And blessed be his kingdom, now and forever.  Amen.

 

Collect of the Day

Celebrant             The Lord be with you.

People                 And also with you.

Celebrant            Almighty and everlasting God, in Christ you have revealed your glory among the nations: Preserve the works of your mercy, that your Church throughout the world may persevere with steadfast faith in the confession of your Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


A reading from the Book of Isaiah (45:1-7)

Thus says the Lord to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have grasped to subdue nations before him and strip kings of their robes, to open doors before him--and the gates shall not be closed:  I will go before you and level the mountains, I will break in pieces the doors of bronze and cut through the bars of iron, I will give you the treasures of darkness and riches hidden in secret places, so that you may know that it is I, the Lord, the God of Israel, who call you by your name.  For the sake of my servant Jacob, and Israel my chosen, I call you by your name, I surname you, though you do not know me.  I am the Lord, and there is no other; besides me there is no god. I arm you, though you do not know me, so that they may know, from the rising of the sun and from the west, that there is no one besides me; I am the Lord, and there is no other. I form light and create darkness, I make weal and create woe; I the Lord do all these things.

Reader    The Word of the Lord.

People     Thanks be to God.

 

Celebrant             The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew (22:15-22)

People                 Glory to you, Lord Christ.

Then the Pharisees went and took counsel how to entangle him in his talk. And they sent their disciples to him, along with the Hero’di-ans, saying, “Teacher, we know that you are true, and teach the way of God truthfully, and care for no man; for you do not regard the position of men.  Tell us, then, what you think. Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not?” But Jesus, aware of their malice, said, “Why put me to the test, you hypocrites? Show me the money for the tax.” And they brought him a coin. And Jesus said to them, “Whose likeness and inscription is this?”  They said, “Caesar’s.” Then he said to them, “Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.”  When they heard it, they marveled; and they left him and went away.

Celebrant             The Gospel of the Lord.

People                 Praise to you, Lord Christ.


Reflection                                                                                                                          Father Piret

This week in the news we have seen a President and a Presidential Candidate hold Town Hall meetings, and a Supreme Court nominee go through confirmation hearings.  On Thursday comes another Debate.  Such events always provide examples of how a questioner can put a candidate in a tight place by posing an awkward question.  Making the candidate navigate dangerous waters, with a sea monster on either side.  One answer will please some voters but alienate others.  The opposite will cause problems of its own.  “Are you going to expand the size of the Supreme Court?”  “Do you disavow QAnon?”  Often some uncommitted reply provides a way out: the candidate will play their cards with a poker face and give away nothing.  Lately we’ve also seen a boom in popularity for another choice, which is to speak at spectacular length on some totally unrelated topic.  All different ways of reacting to a loaded question.

 

It’s that type of question that the Pharisees and Herodians put to Jesus in today’s Gospel.  If he speaks in favor of paying taxes to Caesar he will offend the nationalists who are following him.  If he speaks out against it, he’ll be seen as disloyal to the Empire, putting a target on his back.  “Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not?”  By lawful they mean in keeping with the Jewish Law ... so Jesus is given this choice, between backing the Law of the children of Israel, or seeming to bow to the Empire.

 

Jesus thinks outside the box.  Examine that coin, he says.  Whose picture, whose icon, is stamped on it?  Caesar’s.  Okay, Jesus says.  Let Caesar have that coin.  It bears his image.  But in turn, give God what is due to God.  “Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.”

 

With an important election coming up, Christian voters are called, I would say, to fulfill their obligations to both Caesar and God, at the same time.  The things which are Caesar’s and the things which are God’s are very closely related when we choose leaders in a democratic process.  Who we vote for reflects our principles, it’s a picture of our values, it shows what we think really matters.  (I speak as if the election were entirely out there ahead of us, when I know of course that some of you may have voted already.  I voted a couple of weeks ago myself, mainly because I don’t want to be hanging around standing in lines in a school gym in these times, when it can be done otherwise.)

 

It is definitely not a stretch to see the words of Jesus in our Gospel as extending to the importance of voting.  And his words pull against one option that far too many people take – which is to say things like, “Why bother?” – things like, “The candidates are all the same, they are equally as bad as each other.”  When actually, if we look closely at any particular election, this is rarely true.  Saying that all candidates are equally horrible, so it makes no difference, is more often a kind of laziness, not a reflection of reality.  And it’s just one step away from letting the whole process collapse by default, because we didn’t bother to engage with it.

 

Usually there really is a difference between candidates.  And it’s our job to spend some time comparing, weighing up what those candidates say, and watching what they do.  Of course we can become disappointed by our leaders; of course the whole show can sometimes be nauseating.  Of course we sometimes are deeply disappointed by what some shiny new candidate actually turns out to be, when they start holding the reins of power.  But that should never mean throwing in the towel and writing off the whole process; it doesn’t give us permission to switch off.  Our nation, not to mention our God, require more than that.

 

Winston Churchill wrote, “No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise.”  He went on, famously, to describe democracy as “the worst form of government” – except, he said, for all the alternatives. 

 

Rendering to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s is a reminder that this flawed, imperfect system depends on our participation.  Rendering to God the things which are God’s means that our choices when we vote need to be informed by Christian principles.  I won’t presume to tell you who I think you should vote for.  Being free-minded Episcopalians, you wouldn’t listen anyway.  All I will say, is that when it comes to casting a ballot, our faith and our politics do have to mix.  Remember Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s words: “I don’t know what Bible people are reading if they think that religion and politics don’t mix.” 

 

Because from our religion, from our Christianity, come core principles – like truth; like justice; faith, hope, charity – and care for our fellow men and women, especially those in great need.  We are Christians first, and Elephants or Donkeys only after that. 

 

Putting Christian principles first when we vote, we can never go very far wrong. 

 

God keep us faithful to those principles. 


All stand

Nicene Creed  

We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty,

      maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God,

      eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light,

      true God from true God, begotten, not made, of one Being with the Father.

      Through him all things were made. 

            For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven:

            by the power of the Holy Spirit

            he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary, and was made man.  

            For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried.       On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures;

            he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead,

    and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,

    who proceeds from the Father and the Son.

    With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.

    He has spoken through the Prophets.

  We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.

      We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.

      We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.  Amen.

 

The Prayers of the People

Leader          In peace, we pray to you, Lord God.

Leader            For all people in their daily life and work;


People          For our families, friends, and neighbors, and for those who are alone.

Leader          For this community, the nation, and the world;

People          For all who work for justice, freedom, and peace.

Leader          For the just and proper use of your creation;

People          For the victims of hunger, fear, injustice, and oppression.

Leader          For all who are in danger, sorrow, or any kind of trouble;

People          For those who minister to the sick, the friendless, and the needy.

Leader          For the peace and unity of the Church of God;

People          For all who proclaim the Gospel, and all who seek the Truth.

Leader          For Michael our Presiding Bishop, Lawrence and Geralyn our Bishops; and for all bishops and other                           ministers;


People          For all who serve God in his Church.

Leader          For the special needs and concerns of this congregation.  Among the sick, we remember by name:  Anne, Carlos, Robyn, Donna, Bruce, Danny, Andrew, Robert, Joannie, Craig, Marie-Claire, Ruth, Sarah, Carol and John, Clint, Marianne, Trevor, Bernice and Eddie.  Hear us, Lord;

People          For your mercy is great.

Leader          We thank you, Lord, for all the blessings of this life.

Leader            We will exalt you, O God our King;


People          And praise your Name for ever and ever.

Leader          We pray for all who have died, that they may have a place in your eternal kingdom.

Leader            Lord, let your loving-kindness be upon them;


People          Who put their trust in you.

Leader          We pray to you also for the forgiveness of our sins.


Leader and People

Have mercy upon us, most merciful Father;

in your compassion forgive us our sins,

known and unknown,

things done and left undone;

and so uphold us by your Spirit

that we may live and serve you in newness of life,

to the honor and glory of your Name;

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

Celebrant        Almighty God have mercy on you, forgive you all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen you in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep you in eternal life. Amen.


The Peace - exchanged without physical contact

Celebrant        The peace of the Lord be always with you.

People            And also with you.

 

Great Thanksgiving                                                                     Eucharistic Prayer A -- BCP p. 361

Celebrant             The Lord be with you.

People                 And also with you.

Celebrant             Lift up your hearts.

People                 We lift them to the Lord.

Celebrant             Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.

People                 It is right to give him thanks and praise.

Celebrant           

It is right, and a good and joyful thing, always and everywhere to give thanks to you, Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth.  For you are the source of light and life; you made us in your image, and called us to new life in Jesus Christ our Lord.  Therefore we praise you, joining our voices with Angels and Archangels and with all the company of heaven, who for ever sing this hymn to proclaim the glory of your Name:


Celebrant and People

Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might,

heaven and earth are full of your glory.

    Hosanna in the highest.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.

    Hosanna in the highest.


Celebrant

Holy and gracious Father: In your infinite love you made us for yourself; and, when we had fallen into sin and become subject to evil and death, you, in your mercy, sent Jesus Christ, your only and eternal Son, to share our human nature, to live and die as one of us, to reconcile us to you, the God and Father of all.  He stretched out his arms upon the cross, and offered himself in obedience to your will, a perfect sacrifice for the whole world.

On the night he was handed over to suffering and death, our Lord Jesus Christ took bread; and when he had given thanks to you, he broke it, and gave it to his disciples, and said, “Take, eat: This is my Body, which is given for you.  Do this for the remembrance of me.”  After supper he took the cup of wine; and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, and said, “Drink this, all of you: This is my Blood of the new Covenant, which is shed for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins.  Whenever you drink it, do this for the remembrance of me.”  Therefore we proclaim the mystery of faith:

Christ has died.

Christ is risen.

Christ will come again.

We celebrate the memorial of our redemption, O Father, in this sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving.  Recalling his death, resurrection, and ascension, we offer you these gifts.  Sanctify them by your Holy Spirit to be for your people the Body and Blood of your Son, the holy food and drink of new and unending life in him.  Sanctify us also that we may faithfully receive this holy Sacrament, and serve you in unity, constancy, and peace; and at the last day bring us with all your saints into the joy of your eternal kingdom.  All this we ask through your Son Jesus Christ.  By him, and with him, and in him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit all honor and glory is yours, Almighty Father, now and for ever.  Amen.


 

As our Savior Christ has taught us, we now pray:

Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy Name,

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done,

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those

who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

and the power, and the glory,

for ever and ever. Amen.

 

The Breaking of the Bread       A period of silence is kept.

Celebrant                        Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us;

Celebrant & People           Therefore let us keep the feast.

 

Communion Motet                             Rejoice in the Lord Alway                       Sung by the Virtual Choir 

Words: Philippians 4:4-7                                                                                  Music: Anon (16th century)


Rejoice in the Lord alway, and again I say, rejoice.

Let your softness be known unto all men: the Lord is at hand.

Be careful for nothing: but in all prayer and supplication,

let your petitions be manifest unto God with giving of thanks.

And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding,

shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.  

Amen.

           

 

Post-Communion Prayer                                                                                    BCP p. 365

Celebrant                 Let us pray.

Celebrant and People   

Eternal God, heavenly Father,

you have graciously accepted us as living members

of your Son our Savior Jesus Christ,

and you have fed us with spiritual food

in the Sacrament of his Body and Blood.

Send us now into the world in peace,

and grant us strength and courage

to love and serve you

with gladness and singleness of heart;

through Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

The Priest gives the Blessing

Dismissal

Celebrant             Go in peace to love and serve the Lord. 

People                 Thanks be to God.


Postlude                                                Allegretto in A major     Edoardo Bottigliero (1864-1937)

Service Videos - Earlier Weeks

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